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Voters Approve 10 Propositions, Dissolution Of Dallas Co. Schools

Voters Approve 10 Propositions, Dissolution Of Dallas Co. Schools

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by November 9, 2017 Real Estate

DALLAS, TX — Dallasites took to the polls Tuesday to make their voices heard in their communities. According to Dallas County Elections, 6.51% of registered voters turned out to polling places. Those who voted in Dallas passed all 10 bond propositions that appeared on the ballot, a bond amount totaling $1.05 billion.

Proposition I passed by the narrowest margin with 62.08 percent of voters in favor, while Proposition A passed with the largest margin. Of the 49,362 voters who voted on Proposition A, 78.71 percent voted in favor.

Proposition I creates a $55.4 million general obligations bond to support the city’s economic development program. Proposition A creates a $533.98 million general obligation bond for street and transportation improvements. To see how balloters voted on all 10 propositions, visit Dallas County Elections’ website.

Dallas residents also voted to dissolve Dallas County Schools, the organization that provides transportation to schools in Dallas ISD. Of the 81,144 residents who voted on the issue, 58.26 percent voted against continuing service from DCS.

A dissolution committee tasked with dissolving DCS will begin meeting next Tuesday. Each school district will become responsible for their own transportation services next fall. Districts will have the option to manage their own bus services or hire private transportation companies, NBC 5 reported.

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DCS owes more than $100 million in outstanding debt. DCS property tax will continue to be collected from taxpayers in Dallas county until the debt is paid off, NBC 5 reported.

Voters in Texas also passed 7 statewide constitutional amendments. You can read about those amendments as well as local ballot issues on Patch’s voting guide.

Texans can vote next in March 2018. The last day to register for the March election is Monday, Feb. 5, 2018. Learn more about getting your voter registration here.

Image via Pixabay

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